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User avatar
By gameboy
#402
friedwires Had posted this link on another tread. It is great instructions on how to do it. It is pretty simple.

http://visforvoltage.org/forum/motors-and-drives/1694

Things wrong with this article are:

1). It says 22 winds.

If using 1 wire to wind up the armature rapping each coil 22 times then it is a single wind 22 turn.

2). It says the less winds (actually turns) the higher it will rev but will have less torque. Not True. If you rewind a motor with less turns it has the same exact effect as over volting a motor. More Power.

Rewinding a motor for more power is better than over volting because you can use a larger gauge wire to carry the current. And the less turn you make the motor the more room you have to use heavier wire.

If you take a 500watt motor that has 20 turns you can rewind it with 10 turns and it will be 1000watts Rewind it to 5turns and it will be 1500watts and rev to 7500rpms. with out even over volting it.

You can modify a stock 1000watt motor to put out 2500+watts and rev to 9000rpms.
User avatar
By Knotical
#6128
gameboy wrote:2). It says the less winds (actually turns) the higher it will rev but will have less torque. Not True. If you rewind a motor with less turns it has the same exact effect as over volting a motor. More Power.

Okay, two questions:
  1. What would be the effect of rewinding with less turns and then over-volting? Is that double the benefit or does that risk permanently damaging the motor (or controller)?
  2. Also, if you went the other way and used smaller wire and had more turns would you have fewer revs and the same torque? Or would the torque drop too?

    I can see a benefit for going in this direction to eliminate the need for a gear reduction motor.

gameboy wrote:Rewinding a motor for more power is better than over volting because you can use a larger gauge wire to carry the current. And the less turn you make the motor the more room you have to use heavier wire.

If you take a 500watt motor that has 20 turns you can rewind it with 10 turns and it will be 1000watts Rewind it to 5turns and it will be 1500watts and rev to 7500rpms. with out even over volting it.

You can modify a stock 1000watt motor to put out 2500+watts and rev to 9000rpms.

What do you think are the limits on the stock E300 motor?
User avatar
By timmy2time
#6224
I wrote all of that. To answer you questions, rewinding a motor for more power then over volting is a good question. It would create even more power. If you over volt it too much with too much voltage, amperage, time or those 3 combined, the motor will over heat, the insulation on the armature wire will burn off and the armature will short out. Then the motor has to be rewound again. The amount of power you get out of it when over volting, you could just wind it for the same amount of power that can handle the voltage.

Winding a motor with thinner gauge wire with more turns does not increase torque. It will have less power and less rpm. It will use less energy from the battery at its highest power output. Giving you more run time and range.
User avatar
By Knotical
#6225
Thanks Timmy. I appreciate the explanations.

Now that I think about it I kinda remember an inverse relationship between rpm and torque (power). I remember tiny electric motors having very thin wire, very many turns, very high rpms, and rather low torque. Only by using mechanical advantage (gearing) could you increase the torque at the expense the final output speed.

Does that sound right? Thin wire + many turns = high rpms + low power?

Also, what do you think are the limits (with regards to rewiring) on the stock E300 motor? What is the rational limit of turns (before damaging the motor)? I'm assuming that 36v is the rational limit for voltage - but please correct me if I'm wrong.
User avatar
By timmy2time
#6226
Well the tiny little brushed motors only have 3 segments and 2 brushes and the brushes and commutators are very small for the amount of energy and power that they can deliver so the brushes wear out. If the tiny motors had sufficient surface area on their commutators an brushes, they can make brushed motors way more powerful than the brushless motors of the same size.The bigger motors have way more segments and that is where you would compare to gear reduction of a smaller motor. The diameter of the can and armature also increases torque the larger it is. Just like a larger wheel sprocket gives you more torque. You can have the same amount of turns in both a larger motor with more segments as a tiny motor with only 3 segments but the motor with less segments will have much higher rpm and the lager one will have more torque and less rpm.
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